Places To Visit In Delhi | Top Tourist Destinations - VRGyani News

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Places To Visit In Delhi | Top Tourist Destinations

Delhi, India’s capital territory, is a massive metropolitan area in the country’s north. In Old Delhi, a neighborhood dating to the 1600s, stands the imposing Mughal-era Red Fort, a symbol of India, and the sprawling Jama Masjid mosque, whose courtyard accommodates 25,000 people. Nearby is Chandni Chowk, a vibrant bazaar filled with food carts, sweets shops and spice stalls. 

Area: 1,484 km²
Population: 1.9 crores (2012)
Weather: 19 °C, Wind SE at 21 km/h, 77% Humidity
Colleges and Universities: University of Delhi

Top places to visit in Delhi

Red Fort




The Red Fort is a historic fort in the city of Delhi in India, which served as the main residence of the Mughal Emperors. Every year on the Independence day of India, the Prime Minister hoists the Indian "tricolour flag" at the main gate of the fort and delivers a nationally broadcast speech from its ramparts. On 15 August 1947, the first Prime Minister of India Jawaharlal Nehru raised the Indian national flag above the Lahore Gate. On each subsequent Independence Day, the prime minister has raised the flag and given a speech that is broadcast nationally.

Humayun’s Tomb


Humayun's tomb is the tomb of the Mughal Emperor Humayun in Delhi, India. The tomb was commissioned by Humayun's first wife and chief consort, Empress Bega Begum, in 1569-70, and designed by Mirak Mirza Ghiyas and his son, Sayyid Muhammad, Persian architects chosen by her. It was the first garden-tomb on the Indian subcontinent, and is located in Nizamuddin East, Delhi, India, close to the Dina-panah Citadel, also known as Purana Qila, that Humayun found in 1533. It was also the first structure to use red sandstone at such a scale. 

The tomb was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1993, and since then has undergone extensive restoration work, which is complete. Besides the main tomb enclosure of Humayun, several smaller monuments dot the pathway leading up to it, from the main entrance in the West, including one that even pre-dates the main tomb itself, by twenty years; it is the tomb complex of Isa Khan Niyazi, an Afghan noble in Sher Shah Suri's court of the Suri dynasty, who fought against the Mughals, constructed in 1547 CE.

India Gate

The India Gate is a war memorial located astride the Rajpath, on the eastern edge of the "ceremonial axis" of New Delhi, formerly called Kingsway. It stands as a memorial to 70,000 soldiers of the British Indian Army who died in between 1914–1921 in the First World War, in France, Flanders, Mesopotamia, Persia, East Africa, Gallipoli and elsewhere in the Near and the Far East, and the third Anglo-Afghan War. 

13,300 servicemen's names, including some soldiers and officers from the United Kingdom, are inscribed on the gate. Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, the gate evokes the architectural style of the triumphal arch such as the Arch of Constantine, in Rome, and is often compared to the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, and the Gateway of India in Mumbai. Following the Bangladesh Liberation war in 1972, a structure consisting of a black marble plinth with a reversed rifle, capped by a war helmet and bounded by four eternal flames, was built beneath the archway. This structure, called Amar Jawan Jyoti, has since 1971 served as India's tomb of the unknown soldier.

Jama Masjid


The Masjid e Jahan Numa, commonly known as the Jama Masjid of Delhi, is one of the largest mosques in India. It was built by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan between 1650 and 1656 at a cost of one million rupees, and was inaugurated by Imam Syed Abdul Ghafoor Shah Bukhari from Bukhara, present-day Uzbekistan. The mosque was completed in 1656 AD with three great gates and two 40 metres high minarets constructed with strips of red sandstone and white marble. 

The courtyard can accommodate more than 25,00 people. There are three domes on the terrace which are surrounded by the two minarets. On the floor, a total of 899 black borders are marked for worshippers. The architectural plan of Badshahi Masjid, built by Shah Jahan's son Aurangzeb at Lahore, Pakistan, is similar to the Jama Masjid.

Lotus Temple


The Lotus Temple, located in Delhi, India, is a Baháʼí House of Worship that was dedicated in December 1986. Notable for its flowerlike shape, it has become a prominent attraction in the city. Like all Baháʼí Houses of Worship, the Lotus Temple is open to all, regardless of religion or any other qualification. The building is composed of 27 free-standing marble-clad "petals" arranged in clusters of three to form nine sides, with nine doors opening onto a central hall with a height of slightly over 34.27 metres and a capacity of 2,500 people. 

The Lotus Temple has won numerous architectural awards and has been featured in many newspaper and magazine articles. A 2001 CNN report referred to it as the most visited building in the world.

Akshardham


Akshardham or Swaminarayan Akshardham complex is a Hindu temple, and a spiritual-cultural campus in Delhi, India. Also referred to as Akshardham Temple or Swaminarayan Akshardham, the complex displays millennia of traditional Hindu and Indian culture, spirituality, and architecture. Inspired by Yogiji Maharaj and created by Pramukh Swami Maharaj, it was constructed by BAPS. The temple was officially opened on 6 November 2005 by Pramukh Swami Maharaj in the presence of Dr. A. P. J. Abdul Kalam, Manmohan Singh, L.K Advani and B.L Joshi. The temple, at the centre of the complex, was built according to the Vastu shastra and Pancharatra shastra. In Akshardham Delhi, similar to its predecessor Akshardham Gandhinagar, Gujarat, the main shrine is the focal point and maintains the central position of the entire complex. There are various exhibition halls which provide information about the life and work of Swaminarayan. The designers of the complex have adopted contemporary modes of communication and technology to create the various exhibition halls.

Old Delhi


Old Delhi or Purani Dilli is an area part of the greater city of Delhi, India. It was founded as a walled city named Shahjahanabad in 1639, when Shah Jahan decided to shift the Mughal capital from Agra. The construction of the city was completed in 1648, and it remained the capital of the Mughal Empire until its fall in 1857, when the British Raj took over as paramount power in India. 

It was once filled with mansions of nobles and members of the royal court, along with elegant mosques and gardens. Today, despite having become extremely crowded and inundated, it still serves as the symbolic heart of metropolitan Delhi. Only a few havelis are left and maintained. Upon the 2012 trifurcation of the Municipal Corporation of Delhi, Old Delhi became administered by the North Delhi Municipal Corporation.

Rashtrapati Bhavan



The Rashtrapati Bhavan is the official residence of the President of India located at the Western end of Rajpath in New Delhi, India. Rashtrapati Bhavan may refer to only the 340-room main building that has the president's official residence, including reception halls, guest rooms and offices, also called the mansion; it may also refer to the entire 130-hectare Presidential Estate that additionally includes huge presidential gardens, large open spaces, residences of bodyguards and staff, stables, other offices and utilities within its perimeter walls. In terms of area, it is the largest residence of any head of state in the world.

Chandni Chowk


The Chandni Chowk is one of the oldest and busiest markets in Old Delhi, India. It is located close to Old Delhi Railway Station. The Red Fort monument is located at the eastern end of Chandni Chowk. It was built in the 17th century by Mughal Emperor of India Shah Jahan and designed by his daughter Jahanara. The market was once divided by canals to reflect moonlight and remains one of India's largest wholesale markets.

Laxminarayan Temple


The Laxminarayan Temple, also known as the Birla Mandir is a Hindu temple up to large extent dedicated to Laxminarayan in Delhi, India. Laxminarayan usually refers to Vishnu, Preserver in the Trimurti, also known as Narayan, when he is with his consort Lakshmi. The temple, inaugurated by Mahatma Gandhi, was built by Jugal Kishore Birla from 1933 and 1939. The side temples are dedicated to Shiva, Krishna and Buddha. It was the first large Hindu temple built in Delhi. The temple is spread over 7.5 acres, adorned with many shrines, fountains, and a large garden with Hindu and Nationalistic sculptures, and also houses Geeta Bhawan for discourses. The temple is one of the major attractions of Delhi and attracts thousands of devotees on the festivals of Janmashtami and Diwali.

Purana Qila


Purana Quila, Urdu for Old Fort also formerly called Shergarh & Sher Fort is one of the oldest forts in Delhi, India. The site has been continuously inhabited for 2,500 years and remains dating from the pre-Mauryan period have been found. The present citadel was begun in the time of Humayun and its construction continued under Sher Shah Suri. The site is often identified with the site of Indraprastha, the capital of the kingdoms of the Pandavas from the Mahabharata.


Lodhi Garden


Lodi Gardens or Lodhi Gardens is a city park situated in New Delhi, India. Spread over 90 acres, it contains, Mohammed Shah's Tomb, Tomb of Sikandar Lodi, Shisha Gumbad and Bara Gumbad, architectural works of the 15th century by Lodis - who ruled parts of northern India and Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of modern-day Pakistan, from 1451 to 1526. The site is now protected by the Archaeological Survey of India. The gardens are situated between Khan Market and Safdarjung's Tomb on Lodhi Road and is a hot spot for morning walks for the Delhites.


Sri Bangla Sahib Gurudwara


Gurudwara Bangla Sahib is one of the most prominent Sikh gurdwara, or Sikh house of worship, in Delhi, India and known for its association with the eighth Sikh Guru, Guru Har Krishan, as well as the holly river inside its complex, known as the "Sarovar." 

It was first built as a small shrine by Sikh General Sardar Bhagel Singh Dhaliwal in 1783, who supervised the construction of nine Sikh shrines in Delhi in the same year, during the reign of Mughal Emperor, Shah Alam II. It is situated near Connaught Place, New Delhi on Baba Kharak Singh Marg and it is instantly recognisable by its golden dome and tall flagpole, Nishan Sahib. Located next to it is the Sacred Heart Cathedral.

Raj Ghat


Raj Ghat is a memorial dedicated to Mahatma Gandhi in Delhi, India. Originally it was the name of a historic ghat of Old Delhi. Close to it, and east of Daryaganj was Raj Ghat Gate of the walled city, opening at Raj Ghat to the west bank of the Yamuna River. Later the memorial area was also called Raj ghat. It is a black marble platform that marks the spot of Mahatma Gandhi's cremation, Antyeshti on 31 January 1948, a day after his assassination. It is left open to the sky while an eternal flame burns at one end. Located on Delhi's Ring Road, officially known as Mahatma Gandhi Road, a stone footpath flanked by lawns leads to the walled enclosure that houses the memorial.

Jantar Mantar


Jantar Mantar is located in the modern city of New Delhi. It consists of 13 architectural astronomy instruments. The site is one of five built by Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur, from 1723 onwards, revising the calendar and astronomical tables. There is a plaque fixed on one of the structures in the Jantar Mantar observatory in New Delhi that was placed there in 1910 mistakenly dating the construction of the complex to the year 1710. 

Later research, though, suggests 1724 as the actual year of construction. Its height is 723 feet. The primary purpose of the observatory was to compile astronomical tables, and to predict the times and movements of the sun, moon and planets. Some of these purposes nowadays would be classified as astronomy. Completed in 1724, the Delhi Jantar Mantar had decayed considerably by 1867. The Ram Yantra, the Samrat Yantra, the Jai Prakash Yantra and the Misra Yantra are the distinct instruments of Jantar Mantar.

Qutub Minar Complex


The Qutb complex are monuments and buildings from the Delhi Sultanate at Mehrauli in Delhi in India. Construction of the Qutub Minar "victory tower" in the complex, named after the religious figure Sufi Sant Khwaja Qutbuddin Bakhtiar Kaki, was begun by Qutb-ud-din Aibak, who later became the first Sultan of Delhi of the Mamluk dynasty. It was continued by his successor Iltutmish, and finally completed much later by Firoz Shah Tughlaq, a Sultan of Delhi from the Tughlaq dynasty in 1368 AD. The Qubbat-ul-Islam Mosque, later corrupted into Quwwat-ul Islam, stands next to the Qutb Minar. 


Many subsequent rulers, including the Tughlaqs, Alauddin Khalji and the British added structures to the complex. Apart from the Qutb Minar and the Quwwat ul-Islam Mosque, other structures in the complex include the Alai Darwaza gate, the Alai Minar and the Iron pillar. The Quwwat ul-Islam Mosque was originally built after destroying 27 older Hindu and Jain temples. The pillars of the temples were reused and the original images plastered over. Inside the complex lie the tombs of Iltutmish, Alauddin Khalji and Imam Zamin.


National Museum, New Delhi


The National Museum in New Delhi, also known as the National Museum of India, is one of the largest museums in India. Established in 1949, it holds a variety of articles ranging from pre-historic era to modern works of art. It functions under the Ministry of Culture, Government of India. The museum is situated on Janpath. The blue–print of the National Museum had been prepared by the Gwyer Committee set up by the Government of India in 1946. 

The museum has around 200,000 works of art, both of Indian and foreign origin, covering over 5,000 years. It also houses the National Museum Institute of History of Art, Conservation and Museology on the first floor which was established in 1983 and now is a Deemed to be University since 1989, and runs Masters and Doctoral level courses in History of Art, Conservation and Museology.

Agrasen ki baoli


Agrasen ki Baoli, designated a protected monument by the Archaeological Survey of India under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act of 1958, is a 60-meter long and 15-meter wide historical step well on Hailey Road, near Connaught Place, Jantar Mantar in New Delhi, India. Although there are no known historical records to prove who built Agrasen ki Baoli, it is believed that it was originally built by the legendary king Agrasen, and the present architecture hints at it being rebuilt in the 14th century during the Tughlag period of Delhi Sultanate.

Gandhi Smriti


Gandhi Smriti formerly known as Birla House or Birla Bhavan, is a museum dedicated to Mahatma Gandhi, situated on Tees January Road, formerly Albuquerque Road, in New Delhi, India. It is the location where Mahatma Gandhi spent the last 144 days of his life and was assassinated on 30 January 1948. It was originally the house of the Indian business tycoons, the Birla family. It is now also home to the Eternal Gandhi Multimedia Museum, which was established in 2005. The museum is open for all days except Mondays and National Holidays. 

Safdarjung Tomb



Safdarjung's Tomb is a sandstone and marble mausoleum in Delhi, India. It was built in 1754 in the late Mughal Empire style for Nawab Safdarjung. The monument has an ambience of spaciousness and an imposing presence with its domed and arched red brown and white coloured structures. Safdarjung, Nawab of Oudh, was made prime minister of the Mughal Empire when Ahmed Shah Bahadur ascended the throne in 1748.

National Zoological Park


The National Zoological Park is a 176-acre zoo in New Delhi, India. A 16th-century citadel, a sprawling green island and a motley collection of animals and birds, all in the middle of a burgeoning urban Delhi. The zoo is home to about 1350 animals representing almost 130 species of animals and birds from around the world. The zoo can be seen on foot or using a battery-operated vehicle which can be rented at the zoo. Visitors are not permitted to bring any food other than drinking water, but there is a canteen in the zoo. In 2014 a visitor who was mentally ill, killed as he had fallen into the white tigers enclosure.

Parliament House


The Sansad Bhavan is the house of the Parliament of India, which contains the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha located in New Delhi.

Tughlakabad Fort


Tughlaqabad Fort is a ruined fort in Delhi, built by Ghiyas-ud-din Tughlaq, the founder of Tughlaq dynasty, of the Delhi Sultanate of India in 1321, as he established the fourth historic city of Delhi, which was later abandoned in 1327. It lends its name to the nearby Tughlaqabad residential-commercial area as well as the Tughlaqabad Institutional Area. Tughlaq also built Qutub-Badarpur Road, which connected the new city to the Grand Trunk Road. 

The road is now known as Mehrauli-Badarpur Road. The entry fee for the Fort is Rs. 20 for Indians. Also, nearby is Dr. Karni Singh Shooting Range and Okhla Industrial Area. Surroundings are an important biodiversity area within the Northern Aravalli leopard wildlife corridor stretching from Sariska Tiger Reserve to Delhi. Historical place around sanctuary are Badkhal Lake, 10th century ancient Surajkund reservoir and Anangpur Dam, Damdama Lake, Tughlaqabad Fort and Adilabad ruins. It is contiguous to the seasonal waterfalls in Pali-Dhuaj-Kot villages of Faridabad, the sacred Mangar Bani and the Asola Bhatti Wildlife Sanctuary.

The Garden of Five Senses


The Garden of Five Senses is a park in Delhi, India. Spread over 20 acres, the park is located in Saidul Ajaib village, opposite Saket, near the Mehrauli heritage area. Designed by Delhi architect, Pradeep Sachdeva, the park was developed by Delhi Tourism and Transportation Development Corporation, Delhi at a cost of Rs 10.5 crore, over a period of three years and opened in February 2003. Partly built over a rocky terrain, the garden has various theme areas, including a section on the lines of Mughal Gardens, plus pools of water lilies, bamboo courts, herb gardens and solar energy park

Hazrat Nizamuddin Aulia Dargah


Nizamuddin Dargah is the dargah of one of the Sufi saints, Khwaja Nizamuddin Auliya. Situated in the Nizamuddin West area of Delhi, the dargah is visited by thousands of pilgrims every week. The site is also known for its evening qawwali devotional music sessions. The descendants of Nizamuddin Auliya look after the whole management of dargah Sharif. The present white pearl dome was constructed by nawab syed fàrid murtaza bukhari who was treasurer and mir bakshi of Akbar and Jahangir's empire and was descendent of syed jalaluddin surkhposh bukhari of uch Sharif.

National Rail Museum, New Delhi


The National Rail Museum in Chanakyapuri, New Delhi, displays exhibits on the history of rail transport in India. The museum was inaugurated on 1 February 1977, and spans over 10 acres. It is open every day except Mondays and national holidays. In addition to its vast galleries, the museum features simulations of coaches, diesel, electric and steam engines.

Mehrauli Archaeological Park


Mehrauli Archaeological Park is an archaeological area spread over 200 acre in Mehrauli, Delhi, adjacent to Qutub Minar World Heritage site and the Qutb complex. It consists of over 100 historically significant monuments. It is the only area in Delhi known for 1,000 years of continuous occupation, and includes the ruins of Lal Kot built by Tomar Rajputs in 1060 CE, making it the oldest extant fort of Delhi, and architectural relics of subsequent period, rule of Khalji dynasty, Tughlaq dynasty, Lodhi dynasty of Delhi Sultanate, Mughal Empire, and the British Raj.

Diwan-i-Khas


The Diwan-i-Khas, or Hall of Private Audiences, was a chamber in the Red Fort of Delhi built in 1648 as a location for receptions. It was the location where the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan received courtiers and state guests. It was also known as the Shah Mahal. A gate on the north side of the preceding Diwan-i-Am audience hall led to the innermost court of the palace called Jalau Khana and the Diwan-i-Khas. Originally there were two enclosures on the west of the hall, one for the nobles and the other for those of a lower rank. 

These arcaded courts were destroyed after the Indian Rebellion of 1857. It measures 90 x 67 feet. It consists of a rectangular central chamber, surrounded by a series of arches rising from marble piers. The lower parts of the piers are inlaid with floral designs, while the upper portions are painted and gilded. The four corners of the roof are surmounted by pillared chhatri. The ceiling, which was originally inlaid with silver and gold, was stripped bare by successive financial crises of the empire by the Jats or Marattas. The current ceiling was installed in 1911.

National Gandhi Museum


The National Gandhi Museum or Gandhi Memorial Museum is a museum located in New Delhi, India showcasing the life and principles of Mahatma Gandhi. The museum first opened in Mumbai, shortly after Gandhi was assassinated in 1948. The museum relocated several times before moving to Raj Ghat, New Delhi in 1961.

Shree Adya Katyayani Shaktipeeth Mandir


Chhatarpur Temple is located in a down town area in south of Delhi - Chhatarpur. This temple is dedicated to Goddess, Katyayani. The entire complex of the temple is spread over a wide area of 70 acres. It is located at Chhatarpur, on the southwestern outskirts of the city of Delhi and is just 4 km from Qutub Minar, off Mehrauli-Gurgaon road. The temple was established in 1974, by Baba Sant Nagpal ji, who died in 1998. His samadhi shrine lies in the premises of the Shiv-Gauri Nageshwar Mandir within the temple complex. 

This temple was considered as the biggest temple in India and second largest in the world, before the Akshardham Temple was created in 2005 in Delhi. This temple is totally constructed from marble and on all the facets there is jaali work. It can be classified a vesara style of architecture. Surroundings are an important biodiversity area within the Northern Aravalli leopard wildlife corridor stretching from Sariska Tiger Reserve to Delhi. 

Historical place around sanctuary are Badkhal Lake, 10th century ancient Surajkund reservoir and Anangpur Dam, Damdama Lake, Tughlaqabad Fort and Adilabad ruins.


Jahaz Mahal


Jahaj Mahal, is located next to Hauz-i-Shamsi in Mehrauli, Delhi on its northeastern corner. It was so named, since its reflection in the surrounding reservoir looked like a ship floating on a lake. It is inferred to have been built during the Lodi dynasty period as a pleasure resort, Sarai or an inn.

National Gallery of Modern Art


The National Gallery of Modern Art is the premier art gallery under Ministry of Culture, Government of India. The main museum at Jaipur House in New Delhi was established on 29 March 1954 by the Government of India, with subsequent branches at Mumbai and Bangalore. 

Its collection of more than 1700 works by 2000 plus artists includes artists such as Thomas Daniell, Raja Ravi Verma, Abanindranath Tagore, Rabindranath Tagore, Gaganendranath Tagore, Nandalal Bose, Jamini Roy, Amrita Sher-Gil as well as foreign artists. Some of the oldest works preserved here date back to 1857. With 12,000 square meters of exhibition space, the Delhi branch is one of the world's largest modern art museums.

Moti Masjid



The Moti Masjid is a white marble mosque inside the Red Fort complex in Delhi, India. The name translates into English as "Pearl Mosque." Located to the west of the Hammam and close to the Diwan-i-Khas, it was built by the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb from 1659-1660.

Nehru Park, Delhi


Nehru Park, Delhi, is a large park situated in the Chanakyapuri Diplomatic Enclave of New Delhi. Named after India's first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, the park is spread over an area of 80 acres, close to the heart of the city, and was established in 1969. It is today one of city leading green areas, and a venue for 'Morning Ragas and Evening Ragas Concerts, as part of the "Music in the Park" concerts organized by NDMC, New Delhi Municipal Council, SPIC MACAY music concerts and the annual 'Bhakti Festival'. 

Apart from this it is a regular venue for art events, morning yoga classes, and houses an ancient Shiv Temple and cafe. The park is one of the most famous landmarks of Delhi and a beautiful place to hang out during a sunny winter afternoon in Delhi. An absolute must see for anyone visiting Delhi. The Park has a life size alloy statue of Vladimir Lenin the leader of the Great October Socialist Revolution of Russia. The statue was installed on Ist November 1987 during the 70th anniversary of October Revolution. It was unveiled by then Soviet Premier Nikolai Ryzhkov, Indian Prime-minister Rajiv Gandhi and his wife Sonia Gandhi.

Gurudwara Sis Ganj Sahib ji


Gurdwara Sis Ganj Sahib is one of the nine historical Gurdwaras in Delhi. It was first constructed in 1783 by Baghel Singh Dhaliwal to commemorate the martyrdom site of the ninth Sikh Guru, Guru Tegh Bahadur. Situated in Chandni Chowk in Old Delhi, it marks the site where the ninth Sikh Guru was beheaded on the orders of the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb on 11 November 1675 for refusing to convert to Islam. The Sikh regiment of the Indian army salute the Sis Ganj Gurudwara after saluting the president of India since 1979, the only instance of saluting twice in the Republic Day parade by a regiment of Indian army.

Janpath Road


Janpath, is one of the main roads in New Delhi. It starts out as Radial Road 1 in Connaught Place, adjacent to Palika Bazaar, and runs North-South perpendicular to, and past Rajpath. Originally called Queen's Way, it was an important part of Lutyens' design of the Lutyens' Delhi, upon the inauguration of new capital of India in 1931. 

Janpath Market is one of the most famous markets for tourists in New Delhi. The market essentially is a long line of boutique stores selling products which are hard to find in the malls and multi-chain stores of the city. The long line of boutiques is for budget travellers and shoppers, buyers of handicrafts and garments, curio and numerous Indian-style fast-food places.

Sri Digambar Jain Lal Mandir


Shri Digambar Jain Lal Mandir is the oldest and best-known Jain temple in Delhi, India. It is directly across from the Red Fort in the historical Chandni Chowk area. The temple is known for an avian veterinary hospital, called the Jain Birds Hospital, in a second building behind the main temple. Located just opposite the massive Red Fort at the intersection of Netaji Subhas Marg and Chandni Chowk, Digambar Jain Temple is the oldest Jain temple in the capital. According to Jain scholar Balbhadra Jain's compendium of Digambar Jain shrines in India, it was built in 1656.

Rang Mahal


The Rang Mahal or Palace of Colour is located in the Red Fort, Delhi. It originally served as a part of the imperial harem and was known as the Palace of Distinction during the rule of Shah Jahan. After the British occupied the fort in 1857, Rang Mahal was used as a mess hall for a brief time. The building's interior was once richly painted and decorated. Some apartments of this building are called Shish Mahal due to tiny pieces of mirrors that cover the ceilings. Through the center of the marble palace, a shallow canal called the Stream of Paradise flowed into a marble basin carved into the floor. Under the Rang Mahal was a basement, which women would use on hot summer days.


Khan Market



Khan Market, established in 1951, and named in honour of Abdul Ghaffar Khan. It was ranked as the most expensive retail location in India in 2007. In 2019, it was rated as the world's 20th most expensive retail high street by real estate firm. Now it is world's 20th most expensive retail high street by the same firm.Cushman & Wakefield and is consistently ranked as one of the costliest high-end streets.

Khas Mahal


The Khas Mahal served as the Mughal emperor's private residence in Delhi. The structure is located inside the Red Fort, which is a large fort complex located inside the city. It consists of three parts: the Chamber of Telling Beads, the sleeping chamber, and the wardrobe or sitting room. The interior is decorated with carved white marble painted with colourful floral decorations. The ceiling was also partially gilded. 

The marble screen was carved with the scale of justice, and above it is a particularly important item of Mughal art. The scale used was a depiction of the emperor's justice. The projecting tower to the east of the Khas Mahal is called the Octagonal Tower. The emperor would address his subjects every morning in a ceremony called Jharokha Darshan.

Deer Park


Deer Park is located in South Delhi also known as A.N. Jha Deer Park, named after famous Social worker Aditya Nath Jha. This place is popular for walking, jogging and weekend outings. The Deer Park comprises many subsection such as Duck Park, Picnic Spots Rabbit Enclosures etc. The Park has historical tombs of Mughal Era. 

The park is accessible from Safdarjung Enclave and Green Park, Hauz Khas Village. It is also connected to District Park thus making is approachable from R K Puram near the courts side of the Delhi Lawn Tennis Association.

Shri Kalka Ji Temple


Kalkaji Mandir, also known as Kalkaji Temple, is a Hindu mandir or temple, dedicated to the Hindu Goddess Kali. The temple is situated in the southern part of Delhi, in Kalkaji, a locality that has derived its name from the temple and is located opposite the Nehru Place business centre and close to the Okhla railway station, Kalkaji Mandir metro station. Hindus believe that the image of the Goddess Kalka here is a self-manifested one, and that the shrine dates back to Satya Yuga when the Goddess Kalika had incarnated and killed the demon Raktabija along with other giant demons.


National Science Centre, Delhi


The National Science Centre established in 1992, is a science museum in Delhi, India. It is part of the National Council of Science Museums, an autonomous body under India's Ministry of Culture. It stands close to Gate no 1, of Pragati Maidan overlooking the Purana Qila.

Secretariat Building


The Secretariat Building or Central Secretariat is where the Cabinet Secretariat is housed, which administers the Government of India. Built in the 1910s, it is home to some of the most important ministries of the Cabinet of India. Situated at Raisina Hill, New Delhi, the Secretariat buildings are two blocks of symmetrical buildings on opposite sides of the great axis of Rajpath, and flanking the Rashtrapati Bhavan. 

Sacred Heart Cathedral


The Cathedral Of The Sacred Heart is a Roman Catholic cathedral belonging to the Latin Rite and one of the oldest church buildings in New Delhi, India. Together with St. Columba's School, and the Convent of Jesus and Mary school, it occupies a total area of 14 acres near the south end of Bhai Vir Singh Marg Road in Connaught Place. Christian religious services are held throughout the year.

Supreme Court of India


The Supreme Court of India is the highest judicial forum and final court of appeal under the Constitution of India, the highest constitutional court, with the power of constitutional review. Consisting of the Chief Justice of India and a maximum of 30 other judges, it has extensive powers in the form of original, appellate and advisory jurisdictions. As the final court of appeal of the country, it takes up appeals primarily against verdicts of the high courts of various states of the Union and other courts and tribunals. 



It safeguards fundamental rights of citizens and settles disputes between various governments in the country. As an advisory court, it hears matters which may specifically be referred to it under the constitution by President of India. It also may take cognisance of matters on its own, without anyone drawing its attention to them. The law declared by the supreme court becomes binding on all courts within India and also by the union and state governments. Per Article 142, it is the duty of the president to enforce the decrees of the supreme court.


  • Bara Gumbad
  • Kingdom of Dreams
  • Worlds of Wonder
  • Okhla Bird Sanctuary
  • Leisure Valley Park
  • Sheetla Mata Mandir
  • Yamuna River
  • Sultanpur National Park
  • Tomb of Iltutmish
  • Waste to Wonder Theme Park
  • Aravalli Bio Diversity Park
  • Paranthe Wali Gali
  • Splash The Water Park
  • Just Chill Water Park
  • Monastery Market
  • Madame Tussauds Delhi
  • Khooni Darwaza
  • Ghalib ki Haveli
  • Teen Murti Bhavan
  • Bhuli Bhatiyari Ka Mahal
  • Fatehpuri Mosque
  • Tomb of Sikandar Lodi
  • ISKCON Temple Delhi